, attached to 1994-07-02

Review by dr32timmymeat

dr32timmymeat I'd say this is the first passable Simple. The embryonic versions preceding this were pretty awful. Here you can see the evolution of the tune into something more palatable. Nice that there is an intense Mike jam on either side of it. This was the third Lifeboy in the span of five shows, which is a bit much. This Weekapaug Groove is an all-time energy burst. After the Antelope teasing, things dissolve into jazzy calm before going pure nutso again.
, attached to 1991-07-24

Review by Bob_Loblaw

Bob_Loblaw Pretty middle of the road show as far as the Giant Country Horns tour goes. But there's some good stuff in there. The opening trio of songs are essentially a building peak in CDT that recedes during Coil and sets the stage for Buried Alive when the horns kick in. Gin is great Landlady is a lock song at this point with horns so no surprise there that it's solid. Cavern is sloppy but they get it together. Tela, YEM is a fantastic end note to this set and as expected both are well played. Possum kicks things off on a high note much like the opening two songs from set 1. There's something about this Guelah that just gives the feeling of the guys savoring this song at this point with it's new pal The Asse Festival. I really like how the horns come in during this Bowie. I love all the silly quarky sounds they are making with their horns during the cymbal intro. Jesus Left Chicago is excellent. I really love this Funky Bitch and Frankenstein. Suzy didn't have quite the power that most have from this tour so it's kind of a dull bookend to this set. Overall a fairly average '91 show.
, attached to 1990-10-07

Review by Bob_Loblaw

Bob_Loblaw Solid '90 show that's just as much fun as it is musically strong. Divided Sky is the strong opener that it typically is from this era. I really enjoy the string of songs Uncle Pen - Destiny Unbound. Each has fantastic execution as well as some fun banter before Uncle pen and The Landlady. But that's not the only highlight of this first set. Weekapaug is straight fire and La Grange is textbook "Machine Gun Trey". I feel like the 2nd set is slightly weaker than the first. Tweezer is pretty strong, I didn't know is fun. The Lizards is played top notch and great. GTBT continues the Machine Gun Trey action were La Grange left off. Overall a slightly above average 1990 show. Nothing crazy or new, but standout playing throughout.
, attached to 1994-06-26

Review by dr32timmymeat

dr32timmymeat This is a note-perfect first set. There are no stunning versions of anything, but as a whole it's great. Not jammy, incredibly precise. Second set is novel but not all that enchanting. The 6-minute SOAM jam is among the few moments that is cool in isolation. Everything else really only works because of the play-the-entire-album thing.
, attached to 1989-10-07

Review by Bob_Loblaw

Bob_Loblaw I would say this show is slightly above average for the era (especially the first set) Highlights for me would include an excellent peaky Weekapaug Groove, Trey absolutely destroys it! Fee also is a top notch version and has the feel of exactly how the song should sound. Trey also lights his fretboard on fire during GTBT but I don't think that was in the notes ;)
, attached to 1988-12-17

Review by Bob_Loblaw

Bob_Loblaw The only set that is around is Set 1. But don't sleep on it, it's a strong set. Divided Sky has some excellent execution and power. YEM also does but what else would you expect they played it almost every show at this point. Mockingbird in this era is great as it's fresh and inspired, but also Trey is so young that he is actually able to play all the notes fairly well. Bowie is pretty rough at times but hey he's just a baby at this point!
, attached to 1994-06-23

Review by dr32timmymeat

dr32timmymeat This show is inexplicably lowly rated, imho. Everything around it is 4.3, 4.6, 3.9... and then this is sub-3? Maybe it's just people who were there are only remember the rain. I don't know, but it's not some throwaway show. It's in the middle of a huge run of hotness and deserves a listen even if it's lacking HUGE moments.
, attached to 1994-06-13

Review by dr32timmymeat

dr32timmymeat The end of the first set is underwhelming, with Stash (played at previous show), acoustic (a bit zzz) and Julius (meh). The second set is totally nasty at times but doesn't quite get into a full froth. The flow generated during a hard-rock Cavern and well-executed Reba is stopped cold with Jesus Left Chicago. And then Big Ball Jam is an earsore. The Mike's > Hydrogen > WG is predictably awesome, and the comments about Slave being lit are spot-on. Just a shame that so much filler got into the set.
, attached to 1997-12-28

Review by Bob_Loblaw

Bob_Loblaw Great stepping stone to an epic NYE Run Cities has a very quick but very nice extra funky jam coming out of it. The Curtain > Sample transition is clean and near perfect. Jim has a very straight forward but nice and mellow jam coming out of it. Farmhouse is very sloppy but it's still just a baby. Melt thru Zero is all pretty straight forward and average. Simple has a nice mellow bliss jam, based on the banter about the feedback after I have to wonder if the jam would have extended longer if the feedback wasn't bugging Trey so much, who knows? Ghost has a nice, short, tense jam coming out of it. ScentOAM is a fantastic version. It has a nice eerie yet mellow jam in it's center that I like a lot. And the transition back to the ending is flawless and triumphant! Halley's has a jam in a similar vein as it's 11/22/97 counterpart, but goes a fraction of the distance. Slave is pretty average as is the filler songs at the end of the set. Bold as Love continues the love for Jimi on this tour. Overall a great show. I'm on the fence between giving it 3 and 4 stars as I'd personally rate it a 3.5.
, attached to 1997-12-13

Review by Bob_Loblaw

Bob_Loblaw Lower end grade of tour. High end of most shows played overall. Ya Mar follows the opening song jam trend and has a nice mellow cowfunk jam. I love the crashing segue into Axilla although they stumble a tad, very unique. Theme is excellent like literally every single version from this year. GTBT is a top tier version compared to most, excellent work by Trey. The 2nd set really gets going with Ghost which has a nice vibrating build during it. Mike's song is very unique in the fact that it has added lyrics by Trey and then the silly "Bring in the Dude" banter which seems to keep going surrounded by some pretty chaotic jamming. Hood although kind of fluffy in it's center does have a gorgeous transition into the outro section. Nice long outro coming out of coil which makes it a special encore. Overall not the best show of the tour, but a great one for any era.
, attached to 2017-12-30

Review by shakedown_04092

shakedown_04092 I'm just over here wondering why Phish.net isn't crediting the numerous "Homeward Bound" (Simon & Garfunkel) teases that Trey laced every show with. Just off the top of my head, see the 8:20 mark in "Light" from this show. I know there were others. But as good as this show was, it doesn't nearly touch Jam Night or Powdered Night from the Baker's Dozen, not to mention the last 3 of the BD. I actually enjoyed 12/29/17 even more, but that was probably a result of environment.
, attached to 1997-12-12

Review by Bob_Loblaw

Bob_Loblaw Not my favorite show of the tour but it's got some nice bits and surprises for sure! The segue into 2001 (in a bizarre slot) is perfect and shows meaning to the opening duo of songs. Tweezer (also in a weird spot) has a nice little jam to it. It's basically the same cowfunk jam you get all year out of Tweezer but still nice to listen to. 2nd set has a surprising Saw it again opener with a nice stretch to it. Piper has a surprisingly mellow jam, and I'm assuming one of the first real jams out of it which is very significant considering the damage it will do in the future. Caspian has a nice little jam after that is very bipolar. At first it sounds similar to the 11/23 Gin but then it cools down, only to go back to a thrashing conclusion. The only other highlight from this is the Antelope to close out the show. It is great on every possible level that Antelope can be. Great execution, nice little stretch, fantastic conclusion. That's how it should be played always! 3 Stars
, attached to 1995-11-11

Review by fhqwhgads

fhqwhgads This was a 3-night run at the Fabulous Fox Theatre in Atlanta, beginning with 11/9/95. You can see my reviews for the two previous shows on their respective setlist pages (I wasn't there; these were written based in retrospect upon the recordings on phish.in.) Cars Trucks Buses is a rad opener > a "Mike's Groove" whose "meat" of the sandwich as it were is A Day in the Life and Poor Heart... a truly imaginative approach to the standard Mike's Song > I Am Hydrogen > Weekapaug Groove. Mike's Song takes a somewhat more inventive than usual (for 1995) approach to the then-typical Trey-percussion-rack jam (Trey, at this time, had a little percussion set that he'd forsake his guitar for, temporarily, in order to color jams in a more grid-like fashion that relied less on his prowess as a lead-guitar bandleader.) Weekapaug Groove is pretty reliably "shreddy," with some intriguing space in the jam that definitely qualifies it for Highly Recommended status. The Ya Mar and Stash from this set are also worth giving a tilt and whirl. David Bowie as the second song in the second set is long, but not really that remarkable beyond average-great qualifications: it does break into some typical-of-1995 sub-funk (not sure how to describe this other than "clattering," as coined by @waxbanks I believe, as in "clattering, Rube-Goldberg funk" about a certain Wolfman's Brother from 1997.) Fluffhead and Run Like an Antelope are probably the keepers from the remainder of the set, though I certainly enjoy the HYHU-less take on Suspicious Minds, as well as the Acoustic Army that opens the encore.
, attached to 1995-11-10

Review by fhqwhgads

fhqwhgads It's as if--after the opening Bouncing Around the Room--each band member gets a "feature": Trey in Runaway Jim, featuring arguable Dave's Energy Guide teasing that's not currently noted in the setlist; Fish in Taste That Surrounds, a drummer's workout in any sense; Mike vocally on The Old Home Place, which is briefly helped by Trey; and Page in It's Ice. There're also good renditions of Maze and Guyute in the first set. The Scent of a Mule in Set II, though a Highly Recommended Jam according to .Net, doesn't move me that much, perhaps because I'm not a huge fan of that song in the first place, but I do take note of the You Enjoy Myself -> Crossroads -> You Enjoy Myself. I'm always amazed by how Fishman-led segues tend to originate with Trey moving a motif into a jam and Fish responding somehow (telepathically?) on the drums and then they bust out the segue. The AC/DC Bag is also well worth a listen at least as a contrast lesson with the other big Bags, which were typically spacey and funky. Also listen to the Harry Hood encore, which takes a brief minimalist approach to its Type-I jam that therefore tends to verge on Type II.
, attached to 1995-11-09

Review by fhqwhgads

fhqwhgads What a great show! Hometown for me, this run was, based as I am in the Atlanta area. If only I'd been hip to Phish in 1995... Well, Tweezer Reprise opens the show, reminding me of those two nights in 2010 that had four Tweeprises. Prince Caspian is unusually short here. Punch You in the Eye and Simple contain teases on Led Zeppelin's "The Rover," off of Physical Graffiti. Reba is a wonderful version. Julius, as the second song of the second set, should be a .Net Noteworthy Jam, in my opinion. The beginning boasts some variations on the riff, and the jam is really hot. Bathtub Gin is the next big jam, and it's quite an affair. It veers into takes on the Summer '95 Space Camp jams as well as the Fall '94 atonal weirdness, and almost segues into Rift (landing instead in The Man Who Stepped Into Yesterday.) It still strikes me as funnily poignant to hear tapers "shushing" chompers during the unmiked Hello My Baby... I guess by this point in Phishtory, phans already knew that we'd want to hear this music preserved with the most fidelity possible to the event itself. Please do make it a point to hear this Gin.
, attached to 1997-12-09

Review by Bob_Loblaw

Bob_Loblaw Shows that start with Mike's Song almost always deliver it's science. Mike's is superb to start and get's into the Cow Funk that the other Mike's and Tweezer openers from this year have. My Soul is very strong. Stash is intense as hell, just an excellent version. I love some space between Mike's Song and I Am Hydrogen and I love the contrast between I am Hydrogen and Stash. Weekapaug is explosive and excellent. Pretty solid Loving Cup to close the set as well. Set two has one of my favorite Simple's ever and maybe even my favorite Jam from this year. It's beautiful gorgeous and transcendent. Also the Bowie tease is one of the best in terms of a "tease" and what makes it even better is how seamless the segue into Timber Ho! is. Axilla is an excellent version and a standout among all others. Hood is excellent and the outro is just gorgeous great version. More Jimi love with Fire to close the show and it leaves the energy level at an 11. Great show!
, attached to 1997-12-05

Review by Bob_Loblaw

Bob_Loblaw This show is a kind of testament to how good this show is. Mainly because you might call it a "lower tier night" for this tour. Now you hear that and say to yourself "this show must be terrible" quite on the contrary it is a great show! However not among the other heavy hitters from this tour. Ghost starts off the show with a nice little mellow stretch with some great Trey hose. Wilson is a top notch version that is explosive and everything you would want in the song. Jim has a nice little stretch to it with some nice ambient work by Page. The rest of the set is fairly straight forward. Stash in thunderous, it doesn't go the places that some of it's '97 brothers do but still pretty solid. Julius has a nice little stretch to it but the jam is basically directionless and straightforward. The star of the show IMO is slave. It is a transcendent masterpiece. It sucks you in with Fish's thunderous drums, Mike's rumbling bass, and Trey's noodly wankery. Just like the first set the rest of this set is fairly straightforward. Good encore song, maybe a prelude to the famous Tweezabella the next night? Go Jimi!
, attached to 2017-12-31

Review by Mcrothers

Mcrothers This show IMO was just OK, but deff not my favorite. I thought the playing in the first set by our main man Trey was sub-par to say the least. It was lacking a lot of emotion and defiantly sloppy as hell. The 2nd set was a killer and so was most of the 3rd with the exception of Soul Planet. I mean some of these new songs.... I just really don't get whats going on here. I know what Trey is trying to say to everyone in the song, but its just so damn corny and the worst version of bubble gum music I have ever heard.
, attached to 2017-12-28

Review by crepu

crepu Everyone knows 12/30 is the show of the ’17 NYE run. Perhaps. But there’s something about 12/28 that I prefer. 12/28 was the show that said this is Phish, and that means this isn’t going to be a rehash of the BD, nor would there even be subtle nods or gestures towards those shows. This would be new, different. That’s what Phish does best - evolve. To that, we must acknowledge. And might I add the near lack of filler in any of these shows? 12/28 was my New Years show. Where folks heavily predicted a space-themed gag on 12/31, that’s precisely what we got with 12/28: the spacey jams, layers upon layers, and CK’s lights turned the Garden into a spaceship. Sure, we got that feel from “I Always Wanted It This Way” from the next night (which was fabulous and changed many minds about the song, and one has to wonder if those who detest those particular songs off BIG BOAT like "Waking up Dead" are familiar with XTC or that 80s quirky punk style), or 12/30’s “Steam” (Ok, that was so good). But most of 12/28 worked with the space theme. No, this maybe wasn’t as totally Parliament-dance as some wanted it (although there was plenty of funk), but it was the Mothership of ephemeral zone and drone. I cringe when fans say Phish does shoegaze. They never have, and a soundcheck of My Bloody Valentine sounded nothing of shoegaze. 12/28 was not shoegaze, either, but there was a blending of sounds and layers that some wrongfully dismiss as Trey hiding behind his effects. For those who don’t merely come out of the classic rock scene, for those who kinda like some sloppy or loose play (a la Pavement or Built to Spill, or maybe in the vein of Okkervil River’s lyrics: “And this film we once saw was reviled for its flaws/ But its flaws were what made us have fun”), for those who actually seek the shows many call listless (see those ’99 gems), or for those whose transcendence comes out of ethereal layers without any hint of the blues, 12/28 was special. And it signaled a new kind of Phish in their old tradition of moving on to nuanced territory.
, attached to 1997-12-03

Review by Bob_Loblaw

Bob_Loblaw Another exceptional "Front to Back" show. The first set is just as good as the second which is expected from this tour. PYITE is strong as always to start. Drowned is a random surprise in the slot it's in and has a great mucky funk jam. Gumbo is pretty strong. 2001 (also in a weird slow) is excellent and although doesn't trail far off is an excellent version. Bowie is notable for it's long intro with several creepy "take me out to the ballgame" teases. About halfway through it breaks away from the typical Bowie structure and into a nice groove that is very rhythm driven courtesy of some great work by Fish and Mike. At the end is has an excellent pulsing segue into Possum. Possum is straight fire and has an excellent peak and is followed by a random jam that is very similar to Tube. Hood gets a little stretch and is very well played. And the cherry on top is a great cover of Crossroads which leaves the place ablaze after. Just another excellent show. Don't let the lack of noteworthy versions steer you away lot's of excellent stuff packed in each set!
, attached to 1999-12-18

Review by fhqwhgads

fhqwhgads I rate this show more highly than many others might, primarily because I love the potentially neverending groove of the Do You Feel Like We 2001 (my pet nickname for the "Also Sprach Zarathustra" with Peter Frampton teases.) That jam is a testament to how the cowfunk of 1997 was permuted by this time in Phishtory to a comparable yet disparate version on Phish's sound that was highly rewarding, caveats involving the lot scene aside. Harry Hood opens the show with a long jam. The banter surrounding Dog Log is phun. The Tube and You Enjoy Myself are both worth hearing, even if you tend to avoid sets with lots of TAB tunes in them, especially in rapid succession (Heavy Things, Back on the Train, First Tube.) The Do You Feel Like We 2001 seems like they could've just jammed that out for a whole set, but eventually it > Sand. I also really enjoy this Sand, which kicks into a higher, peakier gear than Sand usually tended to in Fall '99. Possum is also kind of "shreddy," but the remaining big aspect of this show, for me, is the segue (->) from Weekapaug Groove -> Buffalo Bill > Weekapaug Groove. One can hear Fishman cottoning on to the transition and shifting his drumming pattern accordingly. I might've been a little disappointed with the encore in person if I'd been at this show--as I'm not much of a fan of either Ya Mar or Sleeping Monkey--but as I believe @Icculus said in reviewing some other show years ago, "at this point, it just didn't matter."
, attached to 2015-07-24

Review by Abe_Froman

Abe_Froman Both band and crowd seemed to take a few songs to sink into this one, but once Reba dropped, it felt like everyone took a deep breath, and we were off. It was a fun blur the rest of the way. I took my time leaving, just staring at the big, lit-up Shoreline tent, and feeling pretty damn good about Hood.
, attached to 1999-12-17

Review by fhqwhgads

fhqwhgads I'm kind of puzzled by the current ~2.7 rating on this show: it may just be "average-great," but it's a high average-great. The setlist is a high recommendation in favor: you get a show-opening jam in Piper followed by Meat > Sparkle, with Meat placed quite intelligently so as not to gum up the works with its methodical funk. Sparkle is a spirited rendition and then there's Gotta Jibboo > Punch You in the Eye, with Jibboo taking a solid Type-I turn as one of the centerpieces of the set. I know some phans don't love that song as much as I do. The lyrics may be silly, but I really dig the groove of it. Not much to say, here, about When the Circus Comes, Water in the Sky, but the set-closing Twist is great! Birds of a Feather to open the second set is marked down as a Noteworthy Jam here on .Net, and I must say I agree. The most unusual thing about this show, however, is that there's about a 5-minute Ambient/Shoegazer Jam between The Moma Dance and Bug. Then comes Jennifer Dances, a song which I'm truly disappointed was abandoned so quickly; I'm mostly a stay-at-home phan, so I don't really care whether something "rages" or is a "dance party," or whatever... I just want to enjoy the songs and the shows. Split Open and Melt is a long version that leaves me feelin' kind of hazy... it's almost 20 minutes, which is rare for Split nowadays and was in 1999 as well. Character Zero is a particularly good version to close the set. Now: the triple encore is outstanding! The Old Home Place doesn't often get played in encores, and then there's a The Squirming Coil > Loving Cup, and though Coil is abbreviated somewhat (only about 7 minutes long), Loving Cup sent phans back out into the Virginia night with one to grow on! I'm not one of those phans that idol-worships Hampton '97 to the exclusion of '98 or '99. Hampton Comes Alive was one of my first Phish purchases, and this two-night run--as you'll see if you read my review of the following night--has a lot of weight to throw around.
, attached to 2014-07-13

Review by fhqwhgads

fhqwhgads Sand is a worthy opener, though not jammed Type II, and the remainder of the first set has a commendable setlist. Reba, Possum, Runaway Jim, Maze, and Split Open and Melt are all heavy hitters. The real story of this show happens to the Chalk Dust Torture > Light > Tweezer from Set II, comprising almost exactly 56 minutes of JAMS. However, not much here is all that memorable stylistically in the sense that a watershed year like 1997 would have you thinking of a specific jam for years to come--perhaps even to this day. The Tweezer to end the triptych is pretty peaky. I also like that Sing Monica appears in this set; it's one of my favorite newer Phish songs, predominantly due to the very clever lyrics. Backwards Down the Number Line makes an abbreviated appearance in the encore > Tweezer Reprise. This is probably a slightly over average-great show, mostly thanks to the breadth and depth of jamming on display, but the lack of truly time-honoured music makes me rate this one just a 4 out of 5.
, attached to 2014-07-12

Review by fhqwhgads

fhqwhgads Just one reason that this show remains notable is a triple ending to Back on the Train. Trey says that to prove it was intentional, they'll do it again, and they do, twice. Personally, I like to hear Devotion to a Dream in its slot in the first set, but otherwise, especially with A Song I Heard the Ocean Sing taking a pedestrian turn, there's not that much to recommend it. Punch You in the Eye in the second set pushes 10 minutes, and is followed by Carini > Ghost, where Ghost takes a Trey-delay-led turn that metamorphoses into a typical 3.0 quasi-peak, but the rest of the set is not that spectacular, particularly regarding the Harry Hood that is introduced by a hi-hat roll rather than the hallowed tom roll. We do get a triple encore, which is great, but if pressed, I'd qualify this show as the least essential of the 2014 Randall's Run.
, attached to 2017-12-31

Review by yemyourface

yemyourface This was a really fun show. Carini opener brought an immediate energy into the Garden which remained consistently throughout the night. Each song played fit just right. The Fluffhead -> Reba segment was truly a bundle full of joy and sweet release early in on in the game. This whole first set encapsulates Phish at its heart and soul. Set two Possum kickoff gets everyone on their toes. Fuego->Jibboo opens up the floor in fashion and displays the light hearted flush of ticklish riffs and grooves letting everyone boogie down and feel good about it. Golgi is the classic Phish always welcome and celebratory, continuing the theme of the night. What’s the Use has a way of captivating the audiences attention in this subtle way that just erupts in everyone’s face and showers everyone in lightness before kicking it into hyperdrive, launching the Garden deep into the depths of space with a raucous YEM. Soul Planet opens up set three and it’s game on once again with a full on dance party done right. The band was flowing with so much energy at this point it felt as though the music was all just gracefully unwinding, pouring out with love and gratitude and happiness. ASIHTOS was the deep space cannonball of the night and erupted in constellatory psychedelia. The descent from the peak of this massive journey is again back to the heart and soul of Phish with emotionally felt renditions of each song played and a particularly tasteful tease of Auld Lang Syne in Moma Dance. Caspian>Wading>First Tube are lumps of space gravy, and Loving Cup is the cover on the whole enchilada until next time. What a beautiful buzz.
, attached to 2014-07-11

Review by fhqwhgads

fhqwhgads The Bathtub Gin and the Down with Disease are the "long jams" of this show, and Bathtub Gin is remarkable for retaining its peaky integrity from pre-hiatus versions and Down with Disease takes a 3.0-ish turn towards exploratory jamming that pays off pretty well, retrospectively, for a 2014 jam. The Moma Dance, 555, Stash, Limb by Limb, and David Bowie all have faithful Type-I readings here. It's, in fact, this version of 555 that re-convinces me that it's a worthy addition to the Phish song catalogue. This is not necessarily a God-tier Phish show, but with two jams approaching 20 minutes, it deserves a listen from even the most sclerotic of phans. Fuego gets an interesting rendition contrasted to the two most previous Type-II excursions. It's an average-great show, but one that phans of 2017 should probably revisit, as it features Trey playing his guitar during the verses of songs, something that happens less and less as 3.0 projects, and which I wish he'd address because it dampens the jams from shows as fertile as those of the Baker's Dozen or the New Year's Run 2017.
, attached to 2004-06-20

Review by fhqwhgads

fhqwhgads The first three songs of the first set are arguably negligible for a longtime phan... a well-versed one who has probably heard those songs rendered better before (though Bill Bailey, Won't You Please Come Home? is always good value.) Waves takes the first extended turn for the night, and it's thoroughly satisfying. Drowned is the next big jam, and though it sounds very "in the mold" of 2.0 as a whole, it has a patient build that rewards careful listening. Seven Below to open the second set is much along the same lines, and Ghost takes a Ghosty turn, but Twist is probably "the" highlight of the night. I don't know how many phans currently active really "get" 2.0, but this Twist is a good encapsulation of what it was all about. Personally, I sat 2.0 out, with the exception of listening to a few shows post facto or watching setlists roll in on PhantasyTour, but this is still a great show for the era and for any era of Phish, and I would be disappointed if phans just overlooked these years for whatever reason.
, attached to 2004-06-19

Review by fhqwhgads

fhqwhgads Reba is an interesting opener (maybe last opened a show on 7/6/00 Toronto?) and ekes along beautifully as Rebas are wont to do. Runaway Jim sustains the energy, but the next big song, Scents and Subtle Sounds, isn't that long, and doesn't compare so much to the Walls of the Cave that stretches 20 minutes and segues into David Bowie. Walls of the Cave boasts a Mike-led ambient jam that is very satisfying. In the second set, A Song I Heard the Ocean Sing approaches 20 minutes, but just kind of treads the typical 2.0 water. The Piper to follow, however, features a long segment of patient improvisation approaching hose levels, especially towards the end when Trey really lets loose. The segue into Gotta Jibboo is also notable. Limb By Limb keeps up the energy > Cavern, and then there's a poignant "2.0" encore of Wading in the Velvet Sea. This is really a representative show of Phish 2.0, if such a claim is tenable, in that it displays some of the characteristic jamming of the time period, and a few of the jams are given quite enough room to breathe.
, attached to 2003-07-31

Review by fhqwhgads

fhqwhgads The Setlist Team has definitely got it right that The Moma Dance is a Recommended Jam. It's the big story of the first set, except perhaps the very satisfying tension-and-release peak of the Wolfman's Brother that precedes the set-closing Possum. Piper kind of goes into ambient passages that are very palpable but may not have that much replay value, but Weekapaug Groove tends towards an high-energy sustain that carries over through to the end of the set into a Harry Hood that has a lot of 2.0-typical jamming, namely the double-stopped kind of Trey playing that integrates so well with Page's and the rhythm section's. I tend to want to find a lot to love in any era of Phish, trying to ignore whatsoever "flaws" there may be in favor of the heights, and though I would rate the previous show more highly due if only to depth of jamming, this is a great show... one that would be oh so welcome now in the 3.0 era, if only people had the diligence to listen to the forest for the trees.
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